OUR BEST DESTINATIONS

worshipped by the tribal people who live in the forest of the Tadoba and Andhari region. Andhari is a river that meanders through the forest gives the name 'Andhari'.

Legend holds that Taru was a village chief who was killed in a mythological encounter with a tiger. A shrine dedicated to the God Taru now exists beneath a huge tree, on the banks of the Tadoba Lake. The temple is frequented by adivasis, especially during the fair held every year in the Hindu month of Pausha, between December and January.

Tadoba Andhari Reserve is the largest national park in Maharashtra. Total area of the Reserve is 1727 km². This includes Tadoba National Park, created in 1955.

Fauna: Tiger is the prime focused species of reserve, except it the other mammals, include: Indian leopards, sloth bears, gaur, nilgai, dhole, striped hyena, small Indian Civet, jungle cats, sambar, spotted deer, barking deer, chital, and chausingha. Tadoba lake sustains the Marsh Crocodile, which were once common all over Maharashtra. Reptiles here include the Indian python and the common Indian monitor. Terrapins, Indian star tortoise, Indian Cobra and Russel's viper also live in Tadoba. The lake is an bird observation hub for ornithologists. It has a wide diversity of water birds, and raptors. 195 species of birds have been recorded, including three endangered species. The Grey-headed fish eagle, the Crested Serpent Eagle, and the Changeable Hawk-Eagle are some of the common raptors. Other interesting species include the Orange-headed Thrush, Indian Pitta, Crested Tree swift, Stone Curlew, Crested Honey Buzzard, Paradise Flycatcher, Bronze-winged Jacana and Lesser Goldenbacked Woodpecker. 74 species of butterflies have been recorded including the pansies, monarch, Mormons and sword tails.

Flora: Tadoba reserve is largely dominated by Southern tropical Dry Deciduous Forest with dense woodlands covering nearly 87 per cent of the protected area. Teak is the predominant tree species. Other deciduous trees include crocodile bark, bija, dhauda, haldi, salai, semal, tendu, palash, axlewood, arjun, beheda, hirda, karaya gum, mahua are the common available species in the area.">
worshipped by the tribal people who live in the forest of the Tadoba and Andhari region. Andhari is a river that meanders through the forest gives the name 'Andhari'.

Legend holds that Taru was a village chief who was killed in a mythological encounter with a tiger. A shrine dedicated to the God Taru now exists beneath a huge tree, on the banks of the Tadoba Lake. The temple is frequented by adivasis, especially during the fair held every year in the Hindu month of Pausha, between December and January.

Tadoba Andhari Reserve is the largest national park in Maharashtra. Total area of the Reserve is 1727 km². This includes Tadoba National Park, created in 1955.

Fauna: Tiger is the prime focused species of reserve, except it the other mammals, include: Indian leopards, sloth bears, gaur, nilgai, dhole, striped hyena, small Indian Civet, jungle cats, sambar, spotted deer, barking deer, chital, and chausingha. Tadoba lake sustains the Marsh Crocodile, which were once common all over Maharashtra. Reptiles here include the Indian python and the common Indian monitor. Terrapins, Indian star tortoise, Indian Cobra and Russel's viper also live in Tadoba. The lake is an bird observation hub for ornithologists. It has a wide diversity of water birds, and raptors. 195 species of birds have been recorded, including three endangered species. The Grey-headed fish eagle, the Crested Serpent Eagle, and the Changeable Hawk-Eagle are some of the common raptors. Other interesting species include the Orange-headed Thrush, Indian Pitta, Crested Tree swift, Stone Curlew, Crested Honey Buzzard, Paradise Flycatcher, Bronze-winged Jacana and Lesser Goldenbacked Woodpecker. 74 species of butterflies have been recorded including the pansies, monarch, Mormons and sword tails.

Flora: Tadoba reserve is largely dominated by Southern tropical Dry Deciduous Forest with dense woodlands covering nearly 87 per cent of the protected area. Teak is the predominant tree species. Other deciduous trees include crocodile bark, bija, dhauda, haldi, salai, semal, tendu, palash, axlewood, arjun, beheda, hirda, karaya gum, mahua are the common available species in the area.">
worshipped by the tribal people who live in the forest of the Tadoba and Andhari region. Andhari is a river that meanders through the forest gives the name 'Andhari'.

Legend holds that Taru was a village chief who was killed in a mythological encounter with a tiger. A shrine dedicated to the God Taru now exists beneath a huge tree, on the banks of the Tadoba Lake. The temple is frequented by adivasis, especially during the fair held every year in the Hindu month of Pausha, between December and January.

Tadoba Andhari Reserve is the largest national park in Maharashtra. Total area of the Reserve is 1727 km². This includes Tadoba National Park, created in 1955.

Fauna: Tiger is the prime focused species of reserve, except it the other mammals, include: Indian leopards, sloth bears, gaur, nilgai, dhole, striped hyena, small Indian Civet, jungle cats, sambar, spotted deer, barking deer, chital, and chausingha. Tadoba lake sustains the Marsh Crocodile, which were once common all over Maharashtra. Reptiles here include the Indian python and the common Indian monitor. Terrapins, Indian star tortoise, Indian Cobra and Russel's viper also live in Tadoba. The lake is an bird observation hub for ornithologists. It has a wide diversity of water birds, and raptors. 195 species of birds have been recorded, including three endangered species. The Grey-headed fish eagle, the Crested Serpent Eagle, and the Changeable Hawk-Eagle are some of the common raptors. Other interesting species include the Orange-headed Thrush, Indian Pitta, Crested Tree swift, Stone Curlew, Crested Honey Buzzard, Paradise Flycatcher, Bronze-winged Jacana and Lesser Goldenbacked Woodpecker. 74 species of butterflies have been recorded including the pansies, monarch, Mormons and sword tails.

Flora: Tadoba reserve is largely dominated by Southern tropical Dry Deciduous Forest with dense woodlands covering nearly 87 per cent of the protected area. Teak is the predominant tree species. Other deciduous trees include crocodile bark, bija, dhauda, haldi, salai, semal, tendu, palash, axlewood, arjun, beheda, hirda, karaya gum, mahua are the common available species in the area.">
worshipped by the tribal people who live in the forest of the Tadoba and Andhari region. Andhari is a river that meanders through the forest gives the name 'Andhari'.

Legend holds that Taru was a village chief who was killed in a mythological encounter with a tiger. A shrine dedicated to the God Taru now exists beneath a huge tree, on the banks of the Tadoba Lake. The temple is frequented by adivasis, especially during the fair held every year in the Hindu month of Pausha, between December and January.

Tadoba Andhari Reserve is the largest national park in Maharashtra. Total area of the Reserve is 1727 km². This includes Tadoba National Park, created in 1955.

Fauna: Tiger is the prime focused species of reserve, except it the other mammals, include: Indian leopards, sloth bears, gaur, nilgai, dhole, striped hyena, small Indian Civet, jungle cats, sambar, spotted deer, barking deer, chital, and chausingha. Tadoba lake sustains the Marsh Crocodile, which were once common all over Maharashtra. Reptiles here include the Indian python and the common Indian monitor. Terrapins, Indian star tortoise, Indian Cobra and Russel's viper also live in Tadoba. The lake is an bird observation hub for ornithologists. It has a wide diversity of water birds, and raptors. 195 species of birds have been recorded, including three endangered species. The Grey-headed fish eagle, the Crested Serpent Eagle, and the Changeable Hawk-Eagle are some of the common raptors. Other interesting species include the Orange-headed Thrush, Indian Pitta, Crested Tree swift, Stone Curlew, Crested Honey Buzzard, Paradise Flycatcher, Bronze-winged Jacana and Lesser Goldenbacked Woodpecker. 74 species of butterflies have been recorded including the pansies, monarch, Mormons and sword tails.

Flora: Tadoba reserve is largely dominated by Southern tropical Dry Deciduous Forest with dense woodlands covering nearly 87 per cent of the protected area. Teak is the predominant tree species. Other deciduous trees include crocodile bark, bija, dhauda, haldi, salai, semal, tendu, palash, axlewood, arjun, beheda, hirda, karaya gum, mahua are the common available species in the area.">
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About Destination:
  • From Airport
    • The nearest International Airport is Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar International Airport, Nagpur (140 km via Umrer, Bhisi and Chimur).
  • From Train
      The nearest railway station is Chandrapur (on the Delhi-Chennai main line) 45 km away.
  • From Road
    • Nearest main bus stand is Chandrapur and Chimur (32 km)
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